Recent Additions

by / on October 3, 2015 at 7:26 pm / in Asia, Campus, Events, Most Recent Column, World

World Leader’s Forum:

Her Excellency Sheikh Hasina, Prime Minister of the Government of Bangladesh delivers an address titled, “Girls Lead the Way,” in Columbia University’s Low Library

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by / on August 10, 2015 at 9:45 am / in Middle East, National Security, World, World

Understanding the Madmen: The Rationale for Iran’s Rhetoric

By recognizing how domestic considerations play a part in Iranian foreign policy, we can better understand why their pronouncements seem to be at odds with their commitments.

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by / on May 9, 2015 at 10:01 pm / in Uncategorized

Briefing: Global Energy Policy

by Despite the efforts of global institutions, energy policy in the developing world continues to be driven by geology, engineering, and economics, not climate change, But it must be recognized that the developing world comes in many shapes and sizes, and the world is in the midst of a carbon-based energy revolution. Dramatically large carbon-based energy resources—oil and gas—have been […]

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 8:36 pm / in Asia, Current Issue, World

Malaysian Malaise – Poor Prospects for Democracy in Anwar Ibrahim’s Legal Woes

To be sure, the headline “Malaysian Court Upholds Opposition Leader’s Sodomy Conviction” is not necessarily shocking in its own right. This is, after all, the era in which political figures being caught up in purportedly lurid sex scandals is now almost cliché.

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 8:29 pm / in Current Issue, Latin America, World

Radio Silence – A Defense of Carmen Aristegui and a Mexican Free Press

Carmen Aristegui, considered the most famous newscast journalist in Mexico, once hosted a daily morning radio talk show followed devoutly by millions of middle-class Mexicans. Her personal brand of investigatory journalism was markedly different from the standard of Mexican media: aggressive, probing—if sometimes lacking in reportorial rigor.

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 8:15 pm / in Asia, World

Taking Aim at Neutrality: Upholding the Principle of Medical Non-interference in Syria

Today, violations of medical neutrality constitute a war crime under the Geneva Convention. Yet, as an international norm, the principle has had minimal influence mitigating violence in the Syrian conflict.

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 8:03 pm / in Africa, Cover Story, Current Issue

A Fatal Feud – Colonial Roots of Kenya’s 2007 Post-election Violence

Since its independence in 1963, Kenya has been hailed as an island of peace and stability within Africa. It therefore came as a surprise to the international community when violence rocked the country starting December 28, 2007, barely twenty-four hours after the conclusion of a highly contested presidential election. What could have caused the 2007 post-election violence?

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 7:57 pm / in Current Issue, Europe, First Person, Interview

Identity Theft? An Exploration of Ukrainian National Identity in the Conflict with Russia

Despite falling out of the headlines of Western news sources, the bloody conflict in Eastern Ukraine is ongoing. This feature of two interviews and a personal piece look to ex- plore deeper questions of Ukrainian national identity and how it relates to Russia, the West, and the politics—both cultural and strategic—of the current conflict.

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 7:33 pm / in Africa, Cover Story, Current Issue

Burning Up and Burning Down – Tracing the Flames of Ethnic Conflict in Côte d’Ivoire and Burundi

Once praised as West Africa’s “beacon of stability,” Côte d’Ivoire shocked the world when its bloody civil war erupted in 2002. The unrest ultimately killed over 1,000 people, according to Freedom House. What sparked this conflict and propagated the violence?

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 7:23 pm / in Asia, Current Issue, Most Recent Column

Kyotastrophe – the Kyoto Protocol’s Inequitable Failure

In 1997, government representatives from 170 states convened, and negotiated their way to form a single plan of action: the Kyoto Protocol. The Protocol called for thirty-eight states to reduce greenhouse gases emissions to 5 percent below their emission levels in 1990 between 2008 and 2012.

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