New York

by / on February 14, 2014 at 9:13 pm / in Domestic, Mounir Ennenbach, New York, Web Columnists

Gentrification or Economic Development?

“Seaport City can provide… protection, while also expanding opportunities for new economic development.”

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by / on February 11, 2014 at 8:09 pm / in Daniel Brovman, Domestic, New York, Web Columnists

New York’s Bloomberg Problem

Essentially, Bloomberg could have been able to ‘buy’ votes by utilizing funding resources unavailable to other city employees or mayoral candidates.

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by / on November 5, 2012 at 11:10 pm / in Domestic, Judicial, New York, Uncategorized

Jazz, Jail, and the New Jim Crow

Since his first encounter with police 65 years ago, Jazz has emerged as a prominent community activist in Harlem. He has earned four university degrees, participated in the lead-up to the 1971 Attica Rebellion in New York, and led a class-action lawsuit against New York State to end its practice of disenfranchising prisoners and parolees. At 71 years old, Jazz continues to organize, and has become one of the leaders of the fight against stop-and frisk.

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by / on March 17, 2012 at 10:52 am / in Congress, Domestic, Election, Interview, New York

Running in the 15th District

Clyde Williams, a potential challenger for the 15th Congressional District of New York, is laying the groundwork for a campaign against longtime representative Charles Rangel.

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by / on October 24, 2011 at 2:51 am / in Business, Domestic, New York

Silicon Implant

by Protestors, slogans, police ­– Wall Street has not seen this kind of exuberance in a long time. The city’s past and present financial powers now meet on Wall Street in the shadow of the World Trade Center memorial – what is a symbol of American strength and unity in the face of mortal terror is now home to discontent […]

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by / on May 4, 2011 at 3:49 am / in Domestic, Humor, Issue, New York

New Yorkers Have Issues

The following is a cache of emails recently declassified by the offices of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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by / on December 8, 2010 at 4:12 pm / in Issue, Main Menu, National Security, New York, World

Constant Vigilance

One of the most difficult elements of coping with terrorist attacks is managing the emotions that it elicits from victims. It is a simple enough argument to state that another terrorist attack on U.S. soil would be unbearable to the American people, but such an attack is inevitable-if not from abroad, then from the new crop of “home-grown” extremists materializing everywhere from Portland, Oregon, to Fort Hood, Texas. The future of terrorist attacks in the U.S. is not going to be on the scale of Sept. 11.

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by / on March 18, 2010 at 6:35 am / in Content, Cover Story, Domestic, Issue, New York

Notes from the 15th Floor

When I moved to New York City last year to attend Columbia University, I knew that finding housing would be a challenge; after three weeks of frustration, I finally managed to find an acceptable studio apartment one mile north of campus. What I didn’t know was that the apartment was available because the previous tenant had recently leapt to his death out of the 15th-story window. That element of surrealism would foreshadow some of my sociological experiences in the new building.

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by / on December 18, 2009 at 7:48 am / in Education, First Person, Issue, New York

My Summer of Love

Susan said that her commune was “the best kind of anarchism, for a short time.” It functioned as an artists’ retreat, collective, and farm; although it now functions solely as a land collective, the colony’s hand-built houses still dotting the hill that leads to Haystack Mountain. A new bridge runs across the brook, whose banks are overgrown with wild raspberries. Upstream, a giant waterfall flows, where the commune members bathed every day, surrounded by rock sculptures. The construction along the brook is destroying their woods, and mountaintop tree removal is visible from the pastures and dirt roads.

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by / on December 18, 2009 at 7:44 am / in Culture, Domestic, Issue, New York

The Wright Stuff

Frank Lloyd Wright had a useful hint for the contemporary urban planner: “Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.” As sentimental as this advice might sound, the role of nature in the context of the built environment is no light concern in the minds of policymakers and planners today. In a nod to the spirit of these “green” times, two current New York exhibitions are exploring the realities and potentials of this role—and in so doing offer two contrasting ways of approaching an understanding of the relationship between the built form and its underlying ecosystem.

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